Unit | Clinical Research

Participant in paediatric TB diagnostic trial, Bagamoyo, Tanzania

The aim of the Clinical Research Unit (CRU) is to design, conduct, analyse and report clinical research studies at Swiss TPH and partner institutions and to provide support for Swiss TPH scientists for clinical questions. The CRU has a focus on clinical trials in phase I to III.

Research

The CRU aims to strengthen high standard clinical research at Swiss TPH. The CRU conducts clinical research in the areas of malaria, febrile illnesses, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, neglected tropical diseases, and emerging non-communicable chronic diseases in low- and middle-income countries in collaboration with numerous partner institutes. Key CRU research areas are found under "Main CRU Activities".

Support

The members of the CRU, who have a wide range of expertise in clinical research, provide scientific support with regard to clinical and methodological aspects during the development of research proposals and protocols. The clinical support is part of the Project and Grant Service at Swiss TPH. All proposals and protocols for clinical trials are reviewed by the CRU. Observational clinical studies may also be reviewed if desired by the investigators.

Research Clinic at IHI, Kingani, Tanzania

Amstutz A et al. SESOTHO trial ("Switch Either near Suppression Or THOusand") - switch to second-line versus WHO-guided standard of care for unsuppressed patients on first-line ART with viremia below 1000 copies/mL: protocol of a multicenter, parallel-group, open-label, r. BMC Infect Dis. 2018;18:76. DOI: 10.1186/s12879-018-2979-y

Boillat Blanco N et al. Hyperglycaemia is inversely correlated with live M. bovis BCG-specific CD4+ T cell responses in Tanzanian adults with latent or active tuberculosis. Immun Inflamm Dis. 2018;6(2):345-353. DOI: 10.1002/iid3.222

Boillat-Blanco N et al. Prognostic value of quickSOFA as a predictor of 28-day mortality among febrile adult patients presenting to emergency departments in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. PLoS One. 2018;13(6):e0197982. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0197982

Cordey S et al. Detection of novel astroviruses MLB1 and MLB2 in the sera of febrile Tanzanian children. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2018;7(1):27. DOI: 10.1038/s41426-018-0025-1

Faini D et al. Laboratory-reflex cryptococcal antigen screening is associated with a survival benefit in Tanzania. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2018(in press). DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001899