Unit | Clinical Research

Participant in paediatric TB diagnostic trial, Bagamoyo, Tanzania

The aim of the Clinical Research Unit (CRU) is to design, conduct, analyse and report clinical research studies at Swiss TPH and partner institutions and to provide support for Swiss TPH scientists for clinical questions. The CRU has a focus on clinical trials in phase I to III.

Research

The CRU aims to strengthen high standard clinical research at Swiss TPH. The CRU conducts clinical research in the areas of malaria, febrile illnesses, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, neglected tropical diseases, and emerging non-communicable chronic diseases in low- and middle-income countries in collaboration with numerous partner institutes. Key CRU research areas are found under "Main CRU Activities".

Support

The members of the CRU, who have a wide range of expertise in clinical research, provide scientific support with regard to clinical and methodological aspects during the development of research proposals and protocols. The clinical support is part of the Project and Grant Service at Swiss TPH. All proposals and protocols for clinical trials are reviewed by the CRU. Observational clinical studies may also be reviewed if desired by the investigators.

Research Clinic at IHI, Kingani, Tanzania

Faini D et al. Laboratory-reflex cryptococcal antigen screening is associated with a survival benefit in Tanzania. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2019;80(2):205-213. DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001899

Keitel K et al. Safety and efficacy of C-reactive protein-guided antibiotic use to treat acute respiratory infections in Tanzanian children: a planned subgroup analysis of a randomized, controlled non-inferiority trial evaluating a novel electronic clinical decision algo. Clin Infect Dis. 2019. DOI: 10.1093/cid/ciz080

Meister I et al. Pooled population pharmacokinetic analysis of tribendimidine for the treatment of Opisthorchis viverrini infections. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2019(in press). DOI: 10.1128/AAC.01391-18

Mhimbira F et al. Prevalence and clinical significance of respiratory viruses and bacteria detected in tuberculosis patients compared to household contact controls in Tanzania: a cohort study. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2019;25(1):107 e1-107 e7. DOI: 10.1016/j.cmi.2018.03.019

Renggli S et al. Towards improved health service quality in Tanzania: appropriateness of an electronic tool to assess quality of primary healthcare. BMC Health Serv Res. 2019;19:55. DOI: 10.1186/s12913-019-3908-5