Sébastien Gagneux, Associate Professor, PhD

Function(s)
Head of Department

Qualification
Associate Professor of Infection Biology

Sébastien Gagneux is Associate Professor of Infection Biology and Head of the Department of Medical Parasitology and Infection Biology at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)/University of Basel. After receiving his PhD from the University of Basel, he worked as a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University and at the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, USA. He then spent three years as a Program Leader at the MRC National Institute for Medical Research in London, UK before joining Swiss TPH. His research focuses on the ecology and evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and combines population genomics, molecular epidemiology and experimental approaches to study the effect of bacterial variation on host-pathogen interaction and drug resistance.

Research activities at Swiss TPH

  • Population genomics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  • Ecology and evolution of antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  • Genomic epidemiology of tuberculosis

Higher education

  • MSc, 1997: Biology & Medical Parasitology, Swiss Tropical Institute/University of Basel, Switzerland
  • PhD, 2001: Epidemiology, Swiss Tropical Institute/University of Basel, Switzerland
  • 2001-2005: Postdoc, Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine, Stanford University, USA
  • 2005-2006: Postdoc, Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, USA

Work experience

  • 2016- : Associate Professor of Infection Biology, Swiss TPH/University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
  • 2016- : Head of Department, Department of Medical Parasitology & Infection Biology, Swiss TPH, Basel, Switzerland
  • 2014-2016: Deputy Head of Department, Department of Medical Parasitology & Infection Biology, Swiss TPH, Basel, Switzerland
  • 2010-2016: SNF-Professor, Swiss TPH/University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
  • 2007-2010: Programme Leader, Medical Research Council, National Institute for Medical Research, London, UK
  • 2006-2007: Senior Scientist, Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, USA

Castro R.A.D et al. The genetic background modulates the evolution of fluoroquinolone-resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mol Biol Evol. 2020;37(1):195-207. DOI: 10.1093/molbev/msz214

Ezewudo M et al. Author correction: Integrating standardized whole genome sequence analysis with a global Mycobacterium tuberculosis antibiotic resistance knowledgebase. Sci Rep. 2020;10(1):3531. DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-58955-y

Haraka F et al. Effect of history of tuberculosis on specificity of Xpert MTB/RIF. Eur Respir J. 2020(in press). DOI: 10.1183/13993003.00343-2020

Loiseau C et al. An African origin for Mycobacterium bovis. Evol Med Public Health. 2020;2020:49-59. DOI: 10.1093/emph/eoaa005

McHenry M.L et al. Interaction between host genes and Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage can affect tuberculosis severity: evidence for coevolution?. PLoS Genet. 2020;16(4):e1008728. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1008728

Oyas O et al. Model-based integration of genomics and metabolomics reveals SNP functionality in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2020;117(15):8494-8502. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1915551117

Sousa J et al. Mycobacterium tuberculosis associated with severe tuberculosis evades cytosolic surveillance systems and modulates IL-1beta production. Nat Commun. 2020;11:1949. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-15832-6

Asante-Poku A et al. TB-diabetes co-morbidity in Ghana: the importance of Mycobacterium africanum infection. PLoS One. 2019;14(2):e0211822. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0211822

Borrell S et al. Reference set of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical strains: a tool for research and product development. PLoS One. 2019;14(3):e0214088. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0214088

Chiner-Oms A et al. Genome-wide mutational biases fuel transcriptional diversity in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Nat Commun. 2019;10(1):3994. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-11948-6